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Faster Detection and Prevention of 5 Serious Cyberthreats

How Security Teams Leverage Near Real-Time Data in UltraThreat Feeds

Every 39 seconds.

That how often bad actors launch cyberattacks, according to a recent university study. And if any one of them succeeds in breaching your system, the damage can begin immediately and balloon to catastrophic levels quickly. The average cost of a data breach is $3.86 million, according to IBM. Their report notes that costs rise significantly the longer the breach goes uncontained – emphasizing the importance of detecting and containing cyberattacks as quickly as possible. Yet fully 53% of successful cyber-attacks infiltrate a network without being detected, and more than nine in ten incidents do not generate an alert. With so many stealthy threats attempting to sneak through your defenses, your security team needs every available tool to gain an advantage over the bad guys and keep your network and your business assets secure.

That’s what your team gains with Neustar UltraThreat Feeds, an indispensable new data resource that immediately strengthens your security posture. This focused data is only now available thanks to advanced analytics that leverage machine learning and artificial intelligence to process enormous amounts of DNS data and detect the telltale fingerprints of malevolent traffic. The traffic is further analyzed to identify sources and targets, and the resulting insights are delivered in near real time. Your security team can now respond to serious threats in their earliest stages – faster than ever before – and in time to prevent serious damage.

This white paper describes how your security team can use UltraThreat Feeds data to:

  1. Identify and block domains created by DGAs
  2. Learn when DNS tunnels are targeting your network
  3. Block the domains created for Phishing schemes
  4. Detect a domain hijack affecting your infrastructure
  5. Uncover users connecting to your network with anonymous proxies

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